Home » Recipes » Spanish Recipes » Spanish Migas (Murcia-Style)

Spanish Migas (Murcia-Style)

Migas murcianas, also known as gachamigas, are the Murcian version of the classic Spanish Migas.

Migas consists of a base, usually made with flour or stale bread, and different toppings – sometimes meat, sometimes fish, and sometimes even fruit. There are many variations in some regions, like Andalucía, Castilla la Mancha, or Murcia. 

This recipe for Murcia-style migas is made with flour, olive oil, garlic, green pepper, and lots of meats ( or “embutido”), including white sausage (similar to Italian sausage), red sausage, morcilla (also known as black pudding or blood sausage), and panceta (raw pork belly).

black pan filled with breadcrumbs and meat being stirred with wooden spoon.
This Migas murcianas recipe is the definition of hearty.

In its origins, migas was a simple recipe made by shepherds with what they had on hand.

Regardless of the type or toppings, migas is a very filling meal intended to be eaten during colder days, especially when it rains. It’s definitely a classic comfort food! 

Ingredients and Substitutions

ingredients to make spanish migas in bowls on counter with labels.

Here are the ingredients – and some substitutions – for this Spanish migas recipe:

  • All-purpose flour – Migas are typically made with regular white flour (all-purpose flour works well), not self-raising flour or whole wheat flour. 
  • Water – To make the flour lumps.
  • Olive oil – If possible, use extra virgin olive oil since it will add lots of flavor to the final dish. Alternatively, any good quality olive oil will do. Don’t use any other kind of oil since it would impact the flavor of the final dish.
  • Salt – Enhances the overall flavor; adjust to taste.
  • Garlic cloves – Use fresh garlic cloves, not dried garlic.
  • Italian green pepper – If you can’t find Italian green peppers, you can also use a regular green bell pepper.
  • Spanish panceta – Raw pork belly (not cured or smoked). If you can’t find any raw pork belly, you can use Italian pancetta (cured). I don’t recommend using bacon since it has a very distinct flavor that can be too overpowering. 
  • Spanish fresh white sausages – Made with minced pork and seasoned with black pepper; also known as salchicha blanca or longaniza blanca. They are quite similar to Italian sausages, so if you can’t find Spanish white longaniza, use regular mild Italian sausages. 
  • Spanish red sausages – Also known as longaniza roja or salchicha roja; a type of fresh sausage made with pork, paprika, and spices and herbs like fennel and black pepper. Its flavor is much milder and less overpowering than chorizo. If you can’t find it, you can use Spanish chorizo instead. If using cured chorizo, do not fry it for too long or it becomes too salty and stiff. 
  • Morcillas – Also known as black pudding or blood sausage in parts of the world. Made with pork blood, lard, onion, and spices. There’s no direct substitute for this ingredient. Feel free to skip if you can’t find any (your migas will still be delicious without).

Recipe Tips

  • Fry all the meats, garlic cloves and green pepper in separate batches to ensure that they are cooked properly and that their fat and flavor is released into the pan and oil. It’s a bit of work, but worth it.
  • Frying garlic with the skin on not only transfers a lot more flavor to the oil, but the actual garlic doesn’t burn because it has a protective layer. Remove the skins if they get loose.
  • When forming the migas, do not add all the water at once, because the exact amount you need may vary (depending on your flour and the amount of olive oil + rendered fat). Also, it is much easier to form the migas by slowly adding water and breaking up the lumps as they form. 
Don't miss out!
Subscribe to Recipes from Europe!

Get updates on the latest posts and more from Recipes from Europe straight to your inbox. 

Invalid email address

How to Make Spanish Migas – Step by Step Instructions

If you like recipe process photos, you can find them in this section and refer to them as you make these Murcia-style migas at home.

Alternatively, jump to the recipe card with all the details – but no visuals – at the bottom of the post!

knife on wooden cutting board cutting green pepper.

First, rinse the green pepper and cut it into pieces, removing the stem and seeds. Then set it aside.

knife cutting garlic cloves on wooden cutting board.

Smash the garlic cloves with the flat side of your knife on the cutting board and do not peel.

Alternatively, just make a slit alongside one of the sides. Set aside.

various sausages and meats on wooden cutting board with knife beside.

Next, cut the panceta and sausages into bite-sized pieces. Also prick the morcillas (blood sausages) with a toothpick to prevent them from bursting during cooking.

black frying pan filled with various meats frying with wooden spoon stirring.

Heat a bit of olive oil in a pan and cook the meats over medium-high heat until browned.

The panceta might take longer to brown and render its fat, so remove the rest of the meats and continue cooking the panceta for a few more minutes.

Then set everything aside on a plate.

black frying pan filled with green pepper pieces and garlic cloves.

In the same pan, add the garlic cloves and green pepper. Season with a pinch of salt and cook over medium heat until golden and fragrant.

Then remove from the pan and set aside.

frying pan filled with white flour and hand pouring glass of water into it.

Now add the flour to the pan, which now contains all the flavor and rendered fat from the meats.

Cook over medium-low heat and mix well until the flour has absorbed all the fat in the pan. Start adding the water slowly, a little at a time, while stirring continuously. This will start forming some clumps.

breadcrumbs being stirred in black frying pan with wooden spatula.

Keep adding water until all the flour has been moistened. Then pour in the remaining olive oil.

Season with salt and continue to cook over medium-low heat, breaking up the larger clumps with the spatula until they are medium-small in size and have turned a golden brown color.

frying pan filled with breadcrumbs peppers and meats being stirred with wooden spatula.

Return the cooked meats, garlic cloves (with skin removed), and green pepper to the pan and mix well.

white dish of spanish migas on counter with pan behind and golden fork beside.

Serve the migas hot and enjoy!

Storage Tips

Migas should be eaten right after being made while still hot. If you have leftovers, store them in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 1 day.

You can reheat the leftovers in a pan with a little more olive oil.

Related Recipes

Here are some other Spanish recipes – mostly savory rice dishes – that are also eaten for lunch:

white dish of spanish migas meat and vegetables with golden spoon sticking out.

Spanish Migas (Murcia-Style)

Migas Muricianas is a classic Spanish comfort dish from the Murcia region. Made with flour, water and olive oil as the hearty base, it's packed with lots of different meats for a flavor explosion.
No ratings yet
Print Pin Save
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes
Servings: 2

Ingredients

  • 1 Italian green pepper, or 1/2 green bell pepper
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 large slices Spanish panceta, raw pork belly or Italian pancetta (around 1 cup chopped)
  • 2 Spanish fresh white sausages
  • 2 Spanish red sausages
  • 2 morcillas
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, (not whole wheat)
  • 2 cups water, approximately
  • cup olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, or to taste

Instructions

  • Cut the green pepper into pieces, removing the stem and seeds. Set aside.
  • Smash the garlic cloves with the flat side of your knife on the cutting board and do not peel. Alternatively, just make a slit alongside one of the sides. Set aside.
  • Cut the panceta and sausages into bite-sized pieces. Prick the morcillas (blood sausages) with a toothpick to prevent them from bursting during cooking.
  • Heat a bit of olive oil in a pan and cook the meats over medium-high heat until browned. The panceta might take longer to brown and render its fat, so remove the rest of the meats and continue cooking the panceta for a few more minutes. Then set everything aside on a plate.
  • In the same pan, add the garlic cloves and green pepper. Season with a pinch of salt and cook over medium heat until golden and fragrant. Then remove from the pan and set aside.
  • Add the white flour to the pan, which now contains all the flavor and rendered fat from the meats. Cook over medium-low heat and mix well until the flour has absorbed all the fat in the pan.
  • Start adding the water slowly, a little at a time, while stirring continuously. This will start forming some clumps, keep adding water until all the flour has been moistened. Then pour in the remaining olive oil.
  • Season with salt and continue to cook over medium-low heat, breaking up the larger clumps with the spatula until they are medium-small in size and have turned a golden brown color.
  • Return the cooked meats, garlic cloves (with skin removed), and green pepper to the pan and mix well.
  • Serve the migas hot.

Notes

  • Italian green pepper – If you can’t find Italian green peppers, you can also use a regular green bell pepper.
  • Spanish panceta – Raw pork belly (not cured or smoked). If you can’t find any raw pork belly, you can use Italian pancetta (cured). I don’t recommend using bacon since it has a very distinct flavor that can be too overpowering.
  • Spanish fresh white sausages – Made with minced pork and seasoned with black pepper; also known as salchicha blanca or longaniza blanca. They are quite similar to Italian sausages, so if you can’t find Spanish white longaniza, use regular mild Italian sausages.
  • Spanish red sausages – Also known as longaniza roja or salchicha roja; a type of fresh sausage made with pork, paprika, and spices and herbs like fennel and black pepper. Its flavor is much milder and less overpowering than chorizo. If you can’t find it, you can use Spanish chorizo instead. If using cured chorizo, do not fry it for too long or it becomes too salty and stiff.
  • Morcillas – Also known as black pudding or blood sausage in parts of the world. Made with pork blood, lard, onion, and spices. There’s no direct substitute for this ingredient. Feel free to skip if you can’t find any (your migas will still be delicious without).
  • When forming the migas, do not add all the water at once, because the exact amount you need may vary (depending on your flour and the amount of olive oil + rendered fat). Also, it is much easier to form the migas by slowly adding water and breaking up the lumps as they form. 

Nutrition

Calories: 1392kcal | Carbohydrates: 101g | Protein: 40g | Fat: 90g | Saturated Fat: 27g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 10g | Monounsaturated Fat: 45g | Trans Fat: 0.02g | Cholesterol: 161mg | Sodium: 2674mg | Potassium: 574mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 700IU | Vitamin C: 69mg | Calcium: 84mg | Iron: 9mg

This nutritional information has been estimated by an online nutrition calculator. It should only be seen as a rough calculation and not a replacement for professional dietary advice.

Course Lunch, Main Course
Cuisine Murcian, Spanish
Don’t miss out!
Subscribe to Recipes from Europe!

Get updates on the latest posts and more from Recipes from Europe straight to your inbox. 

Invalid email address
This recipe was contributed by
Alba Luna Meyer
Born and raised in the Southeast of Spain, Alba is a photographer and a foodie. Always hungry for new flavors and recipes, but with a big passion for traditional recipes that speak about roots and family. You can always find her talking about food, photographing it, or cooking! Obviously, she is team “tortilla de patatas con cebolla”.

Leave a Comment

Recipe Rating